The National Capital Authority has produced this kit to provide secondary teachers throughout Australia with a curriculum-based education resource to support the teaching of Studies of Society and Environment, Australian History and Geography. The booklet presents teachers with the opportunity to reinforce the role of Australia’s national capital and to familiarise students with the unique story of Canberra. It does not cover every aspect of the national capital but has, instead, highlighted some compelling topics which are particularly relevant to the middle secondary student syllabus.

Background notes are provided at the beginning of each unit. These supply the teacher or student with information relating to key dates, events, people and locations within the national capital. Relevant historical quotations are also presented in the background notes, which promote critical social inquiry, discussion and reflection amongst students. These quotes can be used as part of the unit’s activity sheets or in general classroom discussions.

Activity sheets within each unit encourage student development through research projects and reports, surveys, debates, creative design, media investigations and site studies. The activity sheets are reproduced in black and white and can be easily copied directly from this education resource. Each can be modified to suit a specific classroom activity or class learning objective.

An extensive reference list is also provided for teachers interested in accessing current sources of relevant information via the internet, journals and books.

This education resource provides teachers, prior to a school excursion to Canberra, with the ideal opportunity to focus classroom-based activities and discussions on the history, planning and at times false perceptions of our national capital.

We hope you and your students embrace the many stories that lie within Australia’s national capital and gain a better understanding of the unique and fascinating role Canberra plays in Australian society.

Students study a theodolite at the National Capital Exhibition